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Posts from the ‘Presentations’ Category

OEGlobal Presentation: Opening the Curriculum

This session was presented at OEGlobal in Delft and it complimented the article published in the special issue of Open Praxis (full text available here). My abstract described it as: (both the full live video with slides, and the separate slides via SlideShare are embedded below the abstract)

This session presents a student-led international open learning initiative that was then integrated into the university curriculum as a credit-bearing class, and disseminated to the wider community as an eBook. It began with a link facilitating OE enhanced classroom-based teaching between a university music class in England and a high school English class in California. The high school teacher extended an invitation to the university students to meet their high school collaborators, and this became a major international trip that sat completely outside the course curriculum. Five students worked together to organise and fund the trip from the UK to California to lead workshops and perform music with a variety of teachers and students in both formal and informal learning settings. The project was then formally integrated into the university music curriculum as a credit-bearing class, retaining all of the openness of the original initiative, except for the financial uncertainty.

Students can apply to the International Experience module in their final year of study and the small group on the module then work collaboratively to design their curriculum, planning the details of their trip, from travel logistics to their musical interactions. The environment created is one of co-learning, where students are engaged in heutagogy, the highest levels of autonomous learning. The assessed reflective journal encourages students to detail their learning process and engage with deeper learning. Every cohort is completely different.

The original trip was completely documented, and the entire process was written as an eBook. This includes 10,000 words of student-authored content, and depicts the entire journey in order to serve as a model for other students and educators. The eBook was published without DRM.

OEGlobal18 Opening the Curriculum through Open Educational Practices from Laura Ritchie

OER18 Reflections

This morning at OER, I typed as I listened to the keynote. David Wiley started with definitions. (featured image CC-0 by Alan Levine)

I have a tricky time understanding the labels. Names go with identity, and that is very important, but … I tweeted that I got stuck at the first half of his first question. Not that there was anything wrong with it, but if you’re talking definitions, that means semantics comes into it, and well that is a sort of provocation for me.

An analogy- I realise it is very extreme, and draws a simple connection where there are really a dozen steps, but it illustrates a point- We learn. People, providers, researchers, all like to label the learning. We breathe, and we don’t really talk about it because it is natural to breathe – we all do it. People do discuss air, but generally they label the air when there is something wrong with it- like pollution… If we label the air because it’s broken, does that mean we feel the need to label learning because it’s broken too? Perhaps.

I think many people learn inside of their labelled boxes. How did it get into this boxed state that we have to label the stages of opening the lid. Are we backwards in learning? or just looking at learning backwards?

The seeming desire for so many boxes across education is something that baffles me. Read more

Pushing the boat out: Creativity in the Open

Kamloops. Creativity in the Open. Out in the open. The Wilderness stretches as far as the eye can see, and there is water in the valley, snow on the distant mountains, etched clouds above, and wonderful smiles to surround us on the TRU (Thompson Rivers University) campus here in Canada. It was an opportunity to push boundaries and explore. My appetite for learning is large and this was a feast.

The convergence of beautiful surroundings, people, thought, has been magic over the past few days during the Creativity in the Open event, organised by Tanya Dorey. It has been a privilege to share so much with these people. It started as a conversation at an online meeting between academics from diverse fields – a curriculum designer, a biologist, a philosopher, and a musician. It was our ‘play-date’ where we could talk and snatch a precious few moments to know one another better than text-base interactions allow. (there’s a story connecting that meeting to the event that just happened, and that will be in the collaborative magazine Kintsugim issue coming out in about a week)

There is an inherent joy for me, in being at a place and an event where creativity is valued, welcomed, and fostered. I knew that I came bringing something that would be new for people – playing instruments and giving them the tools to make some recognisable sounds in a short space of time. Working together in different ways than the everyday desk environment provides, and using a different medium to convey creativity – sound. I would be pushing people, but there were also opportunities for people to push me. Read more

Value of Creative Education

@laura_ritchie modelling our own practice as creative educators in different medium @HerefordArtsCol 

—Sarah-Jane (@sarahjfc) 20 September 2017

I felt privileged to be there. Really, it was moving. You reminded us of what we do and sometimes as teachers we forget- Seeing him get it and the look on his face. When he looked at you like that, that is what it’s all about. Witnessing that learning happen was really something. -Holland Otik

What was this all about? I was invited to speak at the Hereford College of Arts 10th Annual HE Symposium to speak on ‘the value of a creative education’.

Read more

A self-regulation worksheet: ISPS 2017

I presented at the International Symposium on Performance Science in Iceland on Sept. 1. The presentation was about a research study that I carried out with Phil Kearney where 22 adults learned to play string instruments over the course of a semester. I talked about self-efficacy and self-regulation in learning and how these people managed their learning across the study.

Inspired by Stephen Downes, who shares everything he does, I live streamed the session and both the stream and the slides are embedded below:

Although you can see the slides above, and in the live video

I have a few links within the slides themselves, and also some ‘presenter notes’ that include some of the other references I mentioned that I couldn’t figure out how to make live on the embed, so have listed them footnote-style, below. Read more